In 2012, Public Education Network (PEN) closed its doors after 21 years. PEN was a network of local education funds (LEFs) -- community based organizations in high poverty school districts across the United States -- that continue to work with their school districts and communities to improve public education for the nation's most disadvantaged children.

At the national level, PEN raised the importance of public engagement as an essential component of education reform. It brought the voice of LEFs and the communities they represent into the national education debate. Finally, PEN gave voice to the essential nature of the connection between quality public education and a healthy and thriving democracy.

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An Appeal to All Americans: National Commission on Civic Investment in Public Education

May 24, 2011

A national commission comprised of top education and philanthropic leaders is calling with new urgency for an increase in the nation's commitment to and civic investment in public education. An Appeal to All Americans also represents the first national and independently authored report to outline standards of practice for public and local education funds.As federal and state governments make dramatic cuts to public education funding, the independent National Commission on Civic Investment in Public Education urges the public to redouble its efforts to ensure that the nation's public schools provide a high-quality education for all young people.The Commission, created by Public Education Network (PEN), was charged with making a renewed case for civic investment, highlighting the work of organizations that can build and channel that investment, and developing standards for the rapidly-rising number of citizendriven, local public education assistance organizations - local education funds (LEFs), school foundations, etc. - working throughout our nation to improve public schools.

Students at New York Life Revitalizing High School Libraries Sites Talk About Why Their Library Media Centers Rock!

January 1, 2006

Funded by the New York Life Foundation from 2003-2005, Revitalizing High School Libraries (RHSL) was a pilot program that allowed Public Education Network (PEN) and its member local education funds (LEFs) in Minneapolis, San Francisco and Tampa to update and refurbish library media centers in four high schools. The high schools are: Washburn High School and Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis; Robinson High School in Tampa; and Mission High School in San Francisco. In this issue of Adolescents Read!, we report what students at these schools are saying about the impact that RHSL is having on their experiences with reading and studying. We close with some online resources that students at the four high schools recommend.

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